Composting. So Simple.

It amazes me how changing a few everyday habits can yield such incredible results for your garden.
Is it difficult? No
Does it take patience? Yes
Do you need a Master’s degree? No
If you Google search how to do it, you may just give up before you start. I don’t understand why some people love to complicate the simplest of concepts. If you’re looking for more detailed information I would suggest OrganicGardening.com as they explain how to build a composting pile, simply. We chose to use pallets to build our composting bin. Why pallets? Cuz they’re free!
Check the end of this post for a list of items not to include in your compost bin. Most of it is common sense, you’ll see ;o)
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The Little German assisted The Big German in building the first composting bin out of pallets.  OH, how I love German Engineering
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We save coffee tins and use them in the kitchen to store our scraps.

NEVER COMPOST

Bread products:

Including cakes, pasta and most baked goods. These items in your compost pile draw unwanted pests.

Cooking oil:

Smells like food to animal and insect visitors. It can also upset the compost’s moisture balance.

Diseased plants:

You don’t want to transfer fungal or bacterial problems to whatever ends up growing in your finished compost.

Heavily coated or printed paper:

Magazines, catalogs, printed cards and most printed or metallic wrapping paper.

Human or animal feces:

This includes kitty litter. Waste and bedding from NON-carnivorous pets should be fine.

Meat products:

Including bones, blood, fish and animal fats. Another pest magnet.

Milk products:

Leave out milk, cheese, yogurt and cream. They will also attract unwanted pests.

Rice:

Cooked rice is unusually fertile breeding ground for the kinds of bacteria that you don’t want in your pile. Raw rice attracts varmints.

Sawdust:

Unless you know the wood it came from was untreated, leave it out.

Stubborn garden plants:

Dandelions, ivy and kudzu are examples of plants or weeds which will probably regard your compost heap as a great place to grow, rather than decompose.

Used personal products:

Tampons, diapers and items soiled in human blood or fluids are a health risk.

Walnuts:

These contain juglone, a natural aromatic compound toxic to some plants.

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